Some trading restrictions are in place. Click & Collect and Delivery available. Learn More
Your Store:
Set
  • Understanding Different Types of Timber
Understanding Different Types of Timber

Understanding Different Types of Timber

Different timbers can be used for different purposes around the home whether for interior or exterior usage. They also can require different care. See the common types of timber available in Australia.

Moreover, we recommend sourcing your timber from recycled or sustainable sources that are certified by the Australian Forestry Standard (AFS) and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

Here is an overview of common types of timbers available in Australia:

Brush Box (left), Cypress Pine (centre), Jarrah (right)
Brush Box (left), Cypress Pine (centre), Jarrah (right)

Brush Box (above left) is an Aussie hardwood with colours ranging from a pinky-grey to reddish-brown. It has a natural waxiness and is mostly used for interior flooring or furniture but can also be used for fencing and cladding.

Cypress Pine (above centre) is an Aussie softwood. The colour in this timber can vary from a pale yellow to a mid-tone brown. Knots appear commonly in this timber and can sometimes be prone to surface cracking. This is a versatile timber that takes most coatings well once oils and tannins have been removed and is used for flooring, structures, poles and decking.

Jarrah (above right) is a beautifully dark red Aussie hardwood. Jarrah can be polished up and accepts most coatings well. It is commonly used as flooring, joinery, decking, furniture and panelling.

Merbau (left), Oregon (centre), Radiata Pine (right)
Merbau (left), Oregon (centre), Radiata Pine (right)

Merbau (above left) is a Southeast Asian hardwood also known as Kwila. It is a dark reddish-brown coloured timber that is durable and high in tannins. Merbau timber may require extra applications of timber cleaner prior to coatings to get a squeaky-clean surface. Merbau is most used for fencing, flooring, decking and panelling.

Oregon (above centre) originated in North America but is also grown in New Zealand. It is a softwood that varies in colour from pale reddish-brown to yellow-brown. This timber has a high resin content, which can form crystals on the surface and needs to scraped off before attempting to coat for the best finish. This timber is most used on structural framing and pergolas.

Radiata Pine (above right) is one of the most common untreated softwood timber types. It is typically pale yellow in colour and is suitable for interior use only. You can use this timber for furniture, ceiling and wall boards, plywood and general construction.

Spotted Gum (left), Teak (centre), Treated Pine (right)
Spotted Gum (left), Teak (centre), Treated Pine (right)

Spotted Gum (above left) is an Aussie hardwood that is very dense and oily. The colouring can range from pale to dark brown. Before coating, oils and tannins need to be removed given it is one of the more oily timbers. Spotted Gum is used for flooring, decking, fencing, cladding, retaining walls and structural timber uses.

Teak (above centre) is an Asian hardwood that’s golden brown in colour. It has a waxy/greasy feel and is used for furniture, marine decking and veneers.

Treated Pine (above right) is Radiata Pine that has been treated to resist termites, decay and fungi. The treatment process involves saturating the timber, so it is essential to have the timber completely dry after cleaning and before staining. It is used most on pergolas, fencing and decks.

Victorian Ash (left), Western Red Cedar (right)
Victorian Ash (left), Western Red Cedar (right)

Victorian Ash (above left), an Aussie hardwood, is the trade name for a mix of Mountain Ash and Alpine Ash. It is also commonly known as Tasmanian Oak. The colour of this timber can vary from being a paler pink tone to being paler yellow. It is most used for interior flooring, cupboards, furniture and wall panelling.

Western Red Cedar (above right) comes from North America with colouring ranging from pale to deep brown. This timber in uncoated form will weather and go grey much quicker than other external timbers so maintenance is important for this timber type. Ensure you clean and coat this timber as soon as possible when brand new. This timber accepts most stains and coatings and most used on window framing, garage doors and cladding.

Project Showcase

Visit our Project Showcase for more useful project tips and advice.